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Customer Research

Dear Diary (Study)… How To Ensure You Get The Best Results

“Dear Diary,

How can I ensure I get the best results when conducting a diary study as part of a UX research project?”

Let’s start with a quick overview: diary studies are a research method used to gain qualitative insight into participants’ behaviour (and the context) over a period of time. During the study period, participants are asked to enter information about their activities in a log, diary or journal (online or off) – this is then analysed by the researcher at the end of the observation period.


Talking UX, Psychology and The Power of 100 at UX Sheffield

What do a 40% decrease in traffic accidents overnight, an evening spent watching TV and a good night’s sleep have to do with digital product design? Quite a lot, it turns out.


A Straight Forward, Straight Talking Guide to Mental Models

You may have read up on mental models and still be left thinking, eh? We’re not surprised; there’s lots of explanations out there using flowery language that makes it all sound rather convoluted. But the thing is, mental models shouldn’t be complicated. At Bunnyfoot, we like to practice what we preach. So, here’s a straight forward, straight talking guide to mental models.


What is a diary study?

A diary study helps provide insight into overall behaviour and experience.  The method involves people recording specific events, feelings or interactions, in a diary supplied by the researcher.


How Human-Centred Design could improve politics

As those of us in the UX world know, it’s quite common to watch people struggle to use a site, then subsequently say how easy to use it was – which is why it’s important to observe what people do, not what they say. People tell you what they want in order to achieve the desired response. Could this also apply to political polls?


The Pros and Cons of conducting Usability Testing with multiple participants at the same time

16th November 2016 - This post has 3 comments
Posted by in Brain Bites: 2 Minute Insights
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Our lead Usability Testing course trainer Cathy Carr recently encountered an interesting question from one of her attendees: ‘Would you ever test with more than one participants in a single session?’. The short answer is ‘yes’. Surprised?


Historic Royal Palaces

Recently we worked with Historic Royal Palaces to refine the organisation of their website and also provide input into the visitor experience at their six palaces. In particular, they wanted to grow their UK-based audience outside of London, provide more user-centred programmes for schools, families and young people and engage more overall through film, television and modern online media. Naturally we agreed that an audience-first approach was the key to increasing the visit count and achieving their aims.


Doing it for the kids

Earlier this week, we ran a workshop with the third year Product and Interaction Design students at Ravensbourne’s campus in North Greenwich. As Alumni of Ravensbourne who benefited from the University’s connections with industry during our time there, we were privileged to go and share our industry knowledge and experience with the students.


The guide to UX testing with kids

Technology and kids go together like peanut butter and jam. It’s not healthy, but they’re inseparable. As anxious adults, we tend to limit our children’s exposure to technology, but this could be worse for their development and our own understanding of technology today. This week, Cathy Carr, our Expert Consultant and Course Instructor takes a look at how to create a model environments to observe technology usage by our future generation.


Diary Studies, Capturing Life as it is Lived

Diary studies have been a traditional research method in behaviour research and social sciences for many years. They rely on users self-documenting specific personal experiences, in natural environments, over long periods of time. Typically, users report their activities and create a log of their thoughts, actions and feelings.


About Bunnyfoot

We are psychologists, interaction and design experts, researchers, usability specialists. We cover Web, software, mobile, print, service design and more.
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