19 Posts about
Customer Insight

In UX, ‘Functional’ Doesn’t Cut It; Experiences Need to Be Emotional

A while ago, I noticed a post on Twitter that said, “a user interface is like a joke. If you have to explain it, it’s not very good”. Now, that’s obviously true; if your users have to spend their valuable time figuring out what your website (for example) is trying to tell or sell them or how the interface works – it’s (probably) not very good.

But in terms of user experiences, it’s no longer enough to just be usable; products, sites and services have to be enjoyable – people have to want to use them for them to be a success.


Dear Diary (Study)… How To Ensure You Get The Best Results

“Dear Diary,

How can I ensure I get the best results when conducting a diary study as part of a UX research project?”

Let’s start with a quick overview: diary studies are a research method used to gain qualitative insight into participants’ behaviour (and the context) over a period of time. During the study period, participants are asked to enter information about their activities in a log, diary or journal (online or off) – this is then analysed by the researcher at the end of the observation period.


Ten Things You Need To Know About Open Banking

Open banking launched in the UK earlier this month and is set to shake up the financial services industry as we know it. But how will it really affect customers and service providers?

Here’s the ten things you need to know about open banking…


Why Information Architecture is So Important in UX

You may not be aware of it, but you encounter Information Architecture (IA) many, many times a day, and the list of ways you do so is practically endless – whether it’s on road traffic signs, menus in restaurants, your online banking app, the sports results, and even reading the phone book (if you still use one!)!

But what really is Information Architecture?


What is a diary study?

A diary study helps provide insight into overall behaviour and experience.  The method involves people recording specific events, feelings or interactions, in a diary supplied by the researcher.


How to build habit-forming products and services

A study found that smartphone users check their phone up to 150 times a day, 53% do so within 5 minutes of waking up in the morning. This appetite has been fueled by an increase in processing speeds, smaller devices, faster internet speeds, improved coverage combined with more products, services and entertainment available online.


SH:24 (x3 UXUK Award winner) talk barriers to sexual health

10th February 2017
Posted by in Talks and Presentations
Tags: , ,

SH:24 were last year’s big winners at the UXUK Awards. They took home the grand prize of Best overall User Experience as well as Best Public Sector and Best innovation.

We were lucky enough to have SH:24 designer, Mollie Courtenay, give us an insight into how they created this award winning service. In the informative talk, Mollie shared some of the tools, methods and principles the team used to grow from concept to scalable commissionable service over the last 3 years.


Are you a trendy person?

5th May 2016
Posted by in Brain Feasts: Longer Reads
Tags:

To those who know me well this may come as a surprise, however, the other day my girlfriend said to me “You’re a trendy person aren’t you”. This got me thinking, how did I become this trendy? What does it actually mean? What can we learn from this and how do trends affect customer behaviour?


Why bad recruitment is worse than not testing….

We all know that carrying out usability testing takes time and money, so it is very important that you are testing with the right participants.


Diary Studies, Capturing Life as it is Lived

Diary studies have been a traditional research method in behaviour research and social sciences for many years. They rely on users self-documenting specific personal experiences, in natural environments, over long periods of time. Typically, users report their activities and create a log of their thoughts, actions and feelings.


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