2 Posts by
Hugo Nickols

Video Games – Addictive By Design?

If you were asked to characterise a ‘gamer’, chances are, you’d describe a socially awkward teenage male. That’s the general perception of a gamer – and something that has been perpetuated by films and TV for decades – but it’s a far cry from the truth. In fact, the average gamer is 35 years old, and 40% of gamers are women (and women make up more of the gaming population than boys under 18).

Research has shown that gaming can have a variety of positive impacts on the players. For example, video game technologies like virtual reality have been used to help people recover from PTSD, get over phobias, and learn to manage drug addictions. Action-based games can boost hand eye-coordination for adults and kids, and gaming, in general, can help people relax, feel better, and trigger positive emotional responses.

But nothing is ever black and white. And as gaming has become increasingly adopted as part of the “mainstream” – it’s estimated that there’s at least one gamer in 65% of American households – a dark side has been lurking in the shadows.


Dear Diary (Study)… How To Ensure You Get The Best Results

“Dear Diary,

How can I ensure I get the best results when conducting a diary study as part of a UX research project?”

Let’s start with a quick overview: diary studies are a research method used to gain qualitative insight into participants’ behaviour (and the context) over a period of time. During the study period, participants are asked to enter information about their activities in a log, diary or journal (online or off) – this is then analysed by the researcher at the end of the observation period.


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